From China to Turkey: The Uighurs in a Position of a New Asia’s Rising Force in the Global Jihad

12 January 2017; Siegfried O. Wolf

AFP PHOTO / HAIDAR HAMDANI (Photo credit should read HAIDAR HAMDANI/AFP/Getty Images)

On New Year’s Eve, Istanbul had to witness another major terrorist incident. The gunman who attacked a popular night club in the Turkish Metropole and murdered 39 people and severely injured many more, most likely belonged to the Uighurs, a Muslim community residing in China.[1] This became evident for the Turkish authorities, especially after they arrested numerous suspicious Uighurs in the aftermath of the bloody assault. Being a NATO member and a significant partner in the US-led coalition fighting ISIS (particularly in Syria), Turkey is getting increasingly identified by international terrorists who represent the main target in their Global Jihad.[2] As such, the experience with terrorist attacks at the Bosporus is nothing new.[3] Continue reading “From China to Turkey: The Uighurs in a Position of a New Asia’s Rising Force in the Global Jihad”

Istanbul attack: Why China’s Uighurs are joining global jihadist groups

6 January 2017; by Siegfried O. Wolf

Exclusives interview with Deutsche Welle, conducted by Shamil Shams:

Turkish authorities have arrested a number of people of Uighur origin over the New Year’s Eve attack

The Turkish government has arrested several Uighur Muslims in connection with Istanbul’s nightclub attack. In a DW interview, analyst Siegfried O. Wolf explains why the Uighur issue has expanded beyond China’s borders.

Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Veysi Kaynak said Thursday that the gunman who attacked Istanbul’s Reina nightclub during New Year’s celebrations is likely from China’s Muslim Uighur minority and was a “specially trained member of a (terror) cell.” Turkish authorities have also arrested a number of people of Uighur origin over the attack that killed 39 people. Continue reading “Istanbul attack: Why China’s Uighurs are joining global jihadist groups”

Pakistani and Afghan refugees fear backlash after Berlin attack

20 December 2016; Siegfried O. Wolf

The Berlin terrorism attack has raised concerns about violence against Germany’s asylum seekers. DW spoke to several refugees from Pakistan and Afghanistan about their impression of the situation. On Monday night, a truck slammed into a crowded Christmas market in central Berlin, killing at least 12 people and wounding 48. The suspected driver was detained near the scene while a passenger – reported to be a Polish national – was found dead in the truck. The attention for the first day of investigations, however, was focused on the origins of the suspect: Some news agencies are suggesting that the driver was a 23-year-old Pakistan refugee, who came to Germany last year. He could well be an Afghan or Afghan-Pakistani. By Tuesday evening, police had released the suspect due to insufficient evidence. Continue reading “Pakistani and Afghan refugees fear backlash after Berlin attack”

Heart of Asia participants slam Pakistan over terrorism

4 December 2016

Interview/Quotation with Deutsche Welle,  conducted by Shamil Shams:

Afghan President Ghani and Indian PM Modi have lashed out at Pakistan for its “lack of cooperation” in the fight against terrorism. Ghani also snubbed Islamabad’s 500-million-dollar aid at the Heart of Asia conference.

Continue reading “Heart of Asia participants slam Pakistan over terrorism”

Why are Afghan Shiites being targeted?

23 November 2016, by Siegfried O. Wolf

Interview/Quotation with Deutsche Welle, conducted by Masood Saifullah:

Afghanistan has seen a surge in terror attacks targeting the country’s minority Shiite community. Observers say the attacks are aimed at undercutting the government’s credibility and exacerbating the sectarian tensions.

Continue reading “Why are Afghan Shiites being targeted?”

Sponsors of terrorists. Or not?

31 October 2016; Siegfried O. Wolf

Interview/Quotation with EastWest Magazine, conducted by Daniele Grassi:

Pakistani Christians hold candles to pay tribute and pray for victims of the Army Public School attack in Peshawar on the anniversary of the attack at a ceremony in Lahore, Pakistan, December 16, 2015. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza – RTX1Z006

On 16 December 2014, terrorists burst into a school in Peshawar and killed more than 130 students aged between 10 and 18. The attack was the worst in Pakistan’s history, and many had hoped that after years of ambiguous government policies, which included support for terrorist groups active in various regional theatres of conflict, the horrifying events would signal a turning point. The massacre in Peshawar shocked the entire country and revealed the urgent need for immediate and thorough action to combat terrorism.  Continue reading “Sponsors of terrorists. Or not?”

Afghan government’s control over Kunduz remains fragile

Interview/Quotation with Deutsche Welle, conducted by Masood Saifullah:

A year after Taliban fighters briefly overran Kunduz city, in a major blow to the morale of Afghan security forces, the insurgents continue to pose a major challenge to government troops in the region. DW examines.

Continue reading “Afghan government’s control over Kunduz remains fragile”

The US will Maintain an Offensive Anti-Terror Approach in Afghanistan

Saturday, July 16, 2016

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Image Attribute: U.S. Army soldiers with the 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 5th Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division and Afghan National Army soldiers conduct a combined patrol in the village of Shabila Kalan, Zabul, Afghanistan, on Nov. 30, 2009.  DoD photo by Tech. Sgt. Efren Lopez, U.S. Air Force.  (Released)

On July 6, 2016, US President Barack Obama announced that he will draw down troops to 8,400 by the end of his administration, a remarkable change from the initial target of 5,500. At the moment there are around 9,800 soldiers deployed in order to fight supporting the Afghanistan government in its struggle against the Taliban, Haqqani Network, and to help to undermine attempts by al Qaeda to regroup as well as to fight the emergent threat from ISIS.

Continue reading “The US will Maintain an Offensive Anti-Terror Approach in Afghanistan”

The Fallacy of State Rhetoric: Pakistan, Haqqani Network and Terror in Afghanistan

10 May 2016

This article is based on the notion that terrorism is a political strategy and can be utilized by any actor whether they be individuals, organized groups or loose networks, domestic and international organizations, or even states. Subsequently, the article argues that states can be also terrorist actors and that state terror has to be included in the study of terrorism. Continue reading “The Fallacy of State Rhetoric: Pakistan, Haqqani Network and Terror in Afghanistan”

The Latest Attempt for a Roadmap for Peace in Afghanistan- A Lost Cause?

10 February 2016

The background – Talking About Talks & the remaining inconvenient questions

On February 6, a meeting of the ‘Quadrilateral Coordination Group (QCG) on Afghan Peace and Reconciliation Process’ took place in Islamabad. The QCG is a partnership between Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, and the United States (US) that seeks to promote a conducive environment for the commencement of Afghan-led, Afghan-owned peace talks aimed at reducing violence and establishing lasting peace in Afghanistan and in the region as a whole. This latest meeting was third in the row of the QCG group this year.

Continue reading “The Latest Attempt for a Roadmap for Peace in Afghanistan- A Lost Cause?”