The Latest Attempt for a Roadmap for Peace in Afghanistan- A Lost Cause?

10 February 2016

The background – Talking About Talks & the remaining inconvenient questions

On February 6, a meeting of the ‘Quadrilateral Coordination Group (QCG) on Afghan Peace and Reconciliation Process’ took place in Islamabad. The QCG is a partnership between Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, and the United States (US) that seeks to promote a conducive environment for the commencement of Afghan-led, Afghan-owned peace talks aimed at reducing violence and establishing lasting peace in Afghanistan and in the region as a whole. This latest meeting was third in the row of the QCG group this year.

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Nepal constitutional reform an uphill battle

25 September 2015

Nepal is once again trying to change the nature of its political system. After the end of a 10-year Maoist insurgency in 2006, it is drafting a new constitution. Due to numerous unfortunate political undercurrents, numerous interruptions meant the constitutional-building process was delayed for more than seven years. Finally, on 20 September 2015 Nepal has formally adopted a new constitution, the first to be drawn up by democratically elected representatives after centuries of autocratic rule.

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Negotiating the Non-negotiable: Taliban, Peace and Democracy – Afghanistan’s impossible triangle

31 July 2015

Photo credit: Wikipedia

On July 8th, the first official acknowledged ‘peace talk’ between the Afghan Taliban and the government in Kabul took place (Johnson/Zahra-Malik, 8.7.2015). Facilitated by Pakistan who are being supported by China, delegations of the two conflicting parties met in Murree, a hill resort near Islamabad (cf. Harooni, 8.7.2015). Besides Chinese officials, U.S. representatives were also present during the event (Ahmed, 28.7.2015). The peace talk is being praised by Pakistani authorities as a potential move towards the ending of 14 years insurgency -after the fall of the Taliban regime in 2001-, the major outcome of the gathering was to meet again by end of July after the Muslim holy month of Ramadan (Aljazeera, 8.7.2015). Continue reading “Negotiating the Non-negotiable: Taliban, Peace and Democracy – Afghanistan’s impossible triangle”